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X/Y Problems

While people do sometimes misunderstand questions, in many cases people are attempting to help with an X/Y Problem. http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problemWhat is the XY problem? explains:

The XY problem is asking about your attempted solution rather than your actual problem.

That is, you are trying to solve problem X, and you think solution Y would work, but instead of asking about X when you run into trouble, you ask about Y.

Avoiding X/Y Answers

Answers on purely technical stacks are fairly straightforward, in that an answer either works or it doesn't. Answers on PMSE are less straightforward since both the questions and the answers are more subjective, often involve soft skills that aren't subject to mathematical proofs, and are generally about people and process which means that the answers are rarely orthogonal.

With all of that said, if you want to avoid answers that suggest that you look at a process other than the one that you're currently pursuing, then you should probably note in your question what processes or solutions you've already examined and discarded, and why. Without that information, answerers will generally assume that you haven't considered the alternatives.

"Too Localized" or "Not a Real Question"

It may also be useful to consider that answering a given question without consideration of the underlying issues or possible X/Y problems leads to answers that aren't useful to future visitors, or that aren't really answerable without edits that destroy the author's original intent.

For example, if someone asks:

I am constrained to a single FTE resource capped at 34 hours per week. How can I deliver a successful project that requires 4,000 man-hours within 5 business days?

Questions like that beg for an X/Y answer if they are to be answered at all. Addressing the preconceptions in the question, or the embedded assumptions about the underlying process, are essential to providing a meaningful answer.

If we decide (as a community) to disallow X/Y answers then all that will do is increase the number of questions closed, questions downvoted, and questioners auto-banned for asking low-quality questions. This doesn't seem desirable to me, since many of the X/Y questions elicit valuable answers that remind us all that good project management is about examining underlying process and assumptions, and making them as explicit as possible.

X/Y Problems

While people do sometimes misunderstand questions, in many cases people are attempting to help with an X/Y Problem. http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem explains:

The XY problem is asking about your attempted solution rather than your actual problem.

That is, you are trying to solve problem X, and you think solution Y would work, but instead of asking about X when you run into trouble, you ask about Y.

Avoiding X/Y Answers

Answers on purely technical stacks are fairly straightforward, in that an answer either works or it doesn't. Answers on PMSE are less straightforward since both the questions and the answers are more subjective, often involve soft skills that aren't subject to mathematical proofs, and are generally about people and process which means that the answers are rarely orthogonal.

With all of that said, if you want to avoid answers that suggest that you look at a process other than the one that you're currently pursuing, then you should probably note in your question what processes or solutions you've already examined and discarded, and why. Without that information, answerers will generally assume that you haven't considered the alternatives.

"Too Localized" or "Not a Real Question"

It may also be useful to consider that answering a given question without consideration of the underlying issues or possible X/Y problems leads to answers that aren't useful to future visitors, or that aren't really answerable without edits that destroy the author's original intent.

For example, if someone asks:

I am constrained to a single FTE resource capped at 34 hours per week. How can I deliver a successful project that requires 4,000 man-hours within 5 business days?

Questions like that beg for an X/Y answer if they are to be answered at all. Addressing the preconceptions in the question, or the embedded assumptions about the underlying process, are essential to providing a meaningful answer.

If we decide (as a community) to disallow X/Y answers then all that will do is increase the number of questions closed, questions downvoted, and questioners auto-banned for asking low-quality questions. This doesn't seem desirable to me, since many of the X/Y questions elicit valuable answers that remind us all that good project management is about examining underlying process and assumptions, and making them as explicit as possible.

X/Y Problems

While people do sometimes misunderstand questions, in many cases people are attempting to help with an X/Y Problem. What is the XY problem? explains:

The XY problem is asking about your attempted solution rather than your actual problem.

That is, you are trying to solve problem X, and you think solution Y would work, but instead of asking about X when you run into trouble, you ask about Y.

Avoiding X/Y Answers

Answers on purely technical stacks are fairly straightforward, in that an answer either works or it doesn't. Answers on PMSE are less straightforward since both the questions and the answers are more subjective, often involve soft skills that aren't subject to mathematical proofs, and are generally about people and process which means that the answers are rarely orthogonal.

With all of that said, if you want to avoid answers that suggest that you look at a process other than the one that you're currently pursuing, then you should probably note in your question what processes or solutions you've already examined and discarded, and why. Without that information, answerers will generally assume that you haven't considered the alternatives.

"Too Localized" or "Not a Real Question"

It may also be useful to consider that answering a given question without consideration of the underlying issues or possible X/Y problems leads to answers that aren't useful to future visitors, or that aren't really answerable without edits that destroy the author's original intent.

For example, if someone asks:

I am constrained to a single FTE resource capped at 34 hours per week. How can I deliver a successful project that requires 4,000 man-hours within 5 business days?

Questions like that beg for an X/Y answer if they are to be answered at all. Addressing the preconceptions in the question, or the embedded assumptions about the underlying process, are essential to providing a meaningful answer.

If we decide (as a community) to disallow X/Y answers then all that will do is increase the number of questions closed, questions downvoted, and questioners auto-banned for asking low-quality questions. This doesn't seem desirable to me, since many of the X/Y questions elicit valuable answers that remind us all that good project management is about examining underlying process and assumptions, and making them as explicit as possible.

3 Fixup of bad MSO links to MSE links migration
source | link

X/Y Problems

While people do sometimes misunderstand questions, in many cases people are attempting to help with an X/Y Problem. What is the XY problem?http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem explains:

The XY problem is asking about your attempted solution rather than your actual problem.

  

That is, you are trying to solve problem X, and you think solution Y would work, but instead of asking about X when you run into trouble, you ask about Y.

Avoiding X/Y Answers

Answers on purely technical stacks are fairly straightforward, in that an answer either works or it doesn't. Answers on PMSE are less straightforward since both the questions and the answers are more subjective, often involve soft skills that aren't subject to mathematical proofs, and are generally about people and process which means that the answers are rarely orthogonal.

With all of that said, if you want to avoid answers that suggest that you look at a process other than the one that you're currently pursuing, then you should probably note in your question what processes or solutions you've already examined and discarded, and why. Without that information, answerers will generally assume that you haven't considered the alternatives.

"Too Localized" or "Not a Real Question"

It may also be useful to consider that answering a given question without consideration of the underlying issues or possible X/Y problems leads to answers that aren't useful to future visitors, or that aren't really answerable without edits that destroy the author's original intent.

For example, if someone asks:

I am constrained to a single FTE resource capped at 34 hours per week. How can I deliver a successful project that requires 4,000 man-hours within 5 business days?

Questions like that beg for an X/Y answer if they are to be answered at all. Addressing the preconceptions in the question, or the embedded assumptions about the underlying process, are essential to providing a meaningful answer.

If we decide (as a community) to disallow X/Y answers then all that will do is increase the number of questions closed, questions downvoted, and questioners auto-banned for asking low-quality questions. This doesn't seem desirable to me, since many of the X/Y questions elicit valuable answers that remind us all that good project management is about examining underlying process and assumptions, and making them as explicit as possible.

X/Y Problems

While people do sometimes misunderstand questions, in many cases people are attempting to help with an X/Y Problem. What is the XY problem? explains:

The XY problem is asking about your attempted solution rather than your actual problem.

 

That is, you are trying to solve problem X, and you think solution Y would work, but instead of asking about X when you run into trouble, you ask about Y.

Avoiding X/Y Answers

Answers on purely technical stacks are fairly straightforward, in that an answer either works or it doesn't. Answers on PMSE are less straightforward since both the questions and the answers are more subjective, often involve soft skills that aren't subject to mathematical proofs, and are generally about people and process which means that the answers are rarely orthogonal.

With all of that said, if you want to avoid answers that suggest that you look at a process other than the one that you're currently pursuing, then you should probably note in your question what processes or solutions you've already examined and discarded, and why. Without that information, answerers will generally assume that you haven't considered the alternatives.

"Too Localized" or "Not a Real Question"

It may also be useful to consider that answering a given question without consideration of the underlying issues or possible X/Y problems leads to answers that aren't useful to future visitors, or that aren't really answerable without edits that destroy the author's original intent.

For example, if someone asks:

I am constrained to a single FTE resource capped at 34 hours per week. How can I deliver a successful project that requires 4,000 man-hours within 5 business days?

Questions like that beg for an X/Y answer if they are to be answered at all. Addressing the preconceptions in the question, or the embedded assumptions about the underlying process, are essential to providing a meaningful answer.

If we decide (as a community) to disallow X/Y answers then all that will do is increase the number of questions closed, questions downvoted, and questioners auto-banned for asking low-quality questions. This doesn't seem desirable to me, since many of the X/Y questions elicit valuable answers that remind us all that good project management is about examining underlying process and assumptions, and making them as explicit as possible.

X/Y Problems

While people do sometimes misunderstand questions, in many cases people are attempting to help with an X/Y Problem. http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem explains:

The XY problem is asking about your attempted solution rather than your actual problem.

 

That is, you are trying to solve problem X, and you think solution Y would work, but instead of asking about X when you run into trouble, you ask about Y.

Avoiding X/Y Answers

Answers on purely technical stacks are fairly straightforward, in that an answer either works or it doesn't. Answers on PMSE are less straightforward since both the questions and the answers are more subjective, often involve soft skills that aren't subject to mathematical proofs, and are generally about people and process which means that the answers are rarely orthogonal.

With all of that said, if you want to avoid answers that suggest that you look at a process other than the one that you're currently pursuing, then you should probably note in your question what processes or solutions you've already examined and discarded, and why. Without that information, answerers will generally assume that you haven't considered the alternatives.

"Too Localized" or "Not a Real Question"

It may also be useful to consider that answering a given question without consideration of the underlying issues or possible X/Y problems leads to answers that aren't useful to future visitors, or that aren't really answerable without edits that destroy the author's original intent.

For example, if someone asks:

I am constrained to a single FTE resource capped at 34 hours per week. How can I deliver a successful project that requires 4,000 man-hours within 5 business days?

Questions like that beg for an X/Y answer if they are to be answered at all. Addressing the preconceptions in the question, or the embedded assumptions about the underlying process, are essential to providing a meaningful answer.

If we decide (as a community) to disallow X/Y answers then all that will do is increase the number of questions closed, questions downvoted, and questioners auto-banned for asking low-quality questions. This doesn't seem desirable to me, since many of the X/Y questions elicit valuable answers that remind us all that good project management is about examining underlying process and assumptions, and making them as explicit as possible.

2 Migration of MSO links to MSE links
source | link

X/Y Problems

While people do sometimes misunderstand questions, in many cases people are attempting to help with an X/Y Problem. http://meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problemWhat is the XY problem? explains:

The XY problem is asking about your attempted solution rather than your actual problem.

  

That is, you are trying to solve problem X, and you think solution Y would work, but instead of asking about X when you run into trouble, you ask about Y.

Avoiding X/Y Answers

Answers on purely technical stacks are fairly straightforward, in that an answer either works or it doesn't. Answers on PMSE are less straightforward since both the questions and the answers are more subjective, often involve soft skills that aren't subject to mathematical proofs, and are generally about people and process which means that the answers are rarely orthogonal.

With all of that said, if you want to avoid answers that suggest that you look at a process other than the one that you're currently pursuing, then you should probably note in your question what processes or solutions you've already examined and discarded, and why. Without that information, answerers will generally assume that you haven't considered the alternatives.

"Too Localized" or "Not a Real Question"

It may also be useful to consider that answering a given question without consideration of the underlying issues or possible X/Y problems leads to answers that aren't useful to future visitors, or that aren't really answerable without edits that destroy the author's original intent.

For example, if someone asks:

I am constrained to a single FTE resource capped at 34 hours per week. How can I deliver a successful project that requires 4,000 man-hours within 5 business days?

Questions like that beg for an X/Y answer if they are to be answered at all. Addressing the preconceptions in the question, or the embedded assumptions about the underlying process, are essential to providing a meaningful answer.

If we decide (as a community) to disallow X/Y answers then all that will do is increase the number of questions closed, questions downvoted, and questioners auto-banned for asking low-quality questions. This doesn't seem desirable to me, since many of the X/Y questions elicit valuable answers that remind us all that good project management is about examining underlying process and assumptions, and making them as explicit as possible.

X/Y Problems

While people do sometimes misunderstand questions, in many cases people are attempting to help with an X/Y Problem. http://meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem explains:

The XY problem is asking about your attempted solution rather than your actual problem.

 

That is, you are trying to solve problem X, and you think solution Y would work, but instead of asking about X when you run into trouble, you ask about Y.

Avoiding X/Y Answers

Answers on purely technical stacks are fairly straightforward, in that an answer either works or it doesn't. Answers on PMSE are less straightforward since both the questions and the answers are more subjective, often involve soft skills that aren't subject to mathematical proofs, and are generally about people and process which means that the answers are rarely orthogonal.

With all of that said, if you want to avoid answers that suggest that you look at a process other than the one that you're currently pursuing, then you should probably note in your question what processes or solutions you've already examined and discarded, and why. Without that information, answerers will generally assume that you haven't considered the alternatives.

"Too Localized" or "Not a Real Question"

It may also be useful to consider that answering a given question without consideration of the underlying issues or possible X/Y problems leads to answers that aren't useful to future visitors, or that aren't really answerable without edits that destroy the author's original intent.

For example, if someone asks:

I am constrained to a single FTE resource capped at 34 hours per week. How can I deliver a successful project that requires 4,000 man-hours within 5 business days?

Questions like that beg for an X/Y answer if they are to be answered at all. Addressing the preconceptions in the question, or the embedded assumptions about the underlying process, are essential to providing a meaningful answer.

If we decide (as a community) to disallow X/Y answers then all that will do is increase the number of questions closed, questions downvoted, and questioners auto-banned for asking low-quality questions. This doesn't seem desirable to me, since many of the X/Y questions elicit valuable answers that remind us all that good project management is about examining underlying process and assumptions, and making them as explicit as possible.

X/Y Problems

While people do sometimes misunderstand questions, in many cases people are attempting to help with an X/Y Problem. What is the XY problem? explains:

The XY problem is asking about your attempted solution rather than your actual problem.

 

That is, you are trying to solve problem X, and you think solution Y would work, but instead of asking about X when you run into trouble, you ask about Y.

Avoiding X/Y Answers

Answers on purely technical stacks are fairly straightforward, in that an answer either works or it doesn't. Answers on PMSE are less straightforward since both the questions and the answers are more subjective, often involve soft skills that aren't subject to mathematical proofs, and are generally about people and process which means that the answers are rarely orthogonal.

With all of that said, if you want to avoid answers that suggest that you look at a process other than the one that you're currently pursuing, then you should probably note in your question what processes or solutions you've already examined and discarded, and why. Without that information, answerers will generally assume that you haven't considered the alternatives.

"Too Localized" or "Not a Real Question"

It may also be useful to consider that answering a given question without consideration of the underlying issues or possible X/Y problems leads to answers that aren't useful to future visitors, or that aren't really answerable without edits that destroy the author's original intent.

For example, if someone asks:

I am constrained to a single FTE resource capped at 34 hours per week. How can I deliver a successful project that requires 4,000 man-hours within 5 business days?

Questions like that beg for an X/Y answer if they are to be answered at all. Addressing the preconceptions in the question, or the embedded assumptions about the underlying process, are essential to providing a meaningful answer.

If we decide (as a community) to disallow X/Y answers then all that will do is increase the number of questions closed, questions downvoted, and questioners auto-banned for asking low-quality questions. This doesn't seem desirable to me, since many of the X/Y questions elicit valuable answers that remind us all that good project management is about examining underlying process and assumptions, and making them as explicit as possible.

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